Changing the Palette to Achieve Serial Imagery

March 31, 2016 § 3 Comments

Rather than portraying our subjects just once, it is always beneficial to take our story line further with serial imagery.   One simple approach is to keep the subject the same and simply change the palette.  Here I start with a fairly monochromatic drawing.

Conservatory Floral (12)         Bernard Chaet’s students’ work at Yale have always represented for me the beauty of diverse personalities’ approach to the same subject and how we can always learn from one another.

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51YGHBB8RQL._SX367_BO1,204,203,200_The Art of Drawing

Next, I begin to add more color, yet keep the palette quite restricted.

Conservatory Floral (13)

The final drawing in this three drawing series enriches the color scheme even further.

Conservatory Floral (2)

All in all, quite a simple solution to creating serial imagery!

 

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Viewing One Composition from Different Perspectives

March 23, 2016 § Leave a comment

One of the most captivating aspects of serial imagery is the exploration of taking one’s story line further.  There are so many ways you can challenge yourself and your viewers.  Here I look at the same composition from a variety of vantage points. Each tells a different story.

Floral with Carved Urn (3)

By doing this, I can fully explore different relationships of color, space, and form

Floral with Carved Urn (4)

Zooming in on the underside of the urn one can better see how the flowers nestle in and are impacted by the dark hues and shadows.

Floral with Carved Urn (5)

The spatial aspects of the composition balance the clustered floral forms.

Floral with Carved Urn (6)

Borrowing From Others or Imitation is the Best Form of Flattery

November 18, 2015 § Leave a comment

IMG_4894

 

This is an oil completed many years ago while in my early learning stages of painting and drawing.  Yet, are we ever done learning?  Part of my self instruction in the beginning was to copy and this was taken from a published photograph. Therefore, I was never able to use this for exhibition or for sale. I learned a lot by examining the work of others.  The goal at the time was to try and capture the tender portrayal by the photographer of a grandmother and small girl.  I was taken by the dramatic light play across the subjects coming from one source, the window; and the added contrast of the darkened room.  While I appreciated the work of the photographer, I began to add touches of my own personality.

Reflection

September 15, 2015 § Leave a comment

Closeup of HazelThis is another drawing of Hazel; a dear friend.  This was part of a series based upon the theme of the mirrored image.  The focus shifted from the self to the mirror.  It brings new meaning to subject of reflection as we ponder ourselves and our place in this world.

Hazel’s View

September 2, 2015 § 4 Comments

My dear departed friend and teacher Hazel looking out of the nursing home window.  That little black dog from the home came and sat at her feet every day.  He knew what kind of person he wanted to be around just the way I did.

Hazel

The Power of Telling our Stories

April 28, 2015 § 2 Comments

IMG_4744    I am showing you a contour of a still life consisting of garlic.  This tool does much of the work for you,  It is revealing of form by demonstrating the light source, laying out your composition, and letting your personality pour out onto the page.  This contour is part of a two drawing series that merely looks at a changing light source.   Here are the gradations that were based on informative contour.  We can begin to say more about our subject material when we examine ways to say something different about it.  Here, we keep the placement of the still life the same and change the light source.gradated garlicIMG_4747

Garlic Still Life

April 8, 2015 § 2 Comments

I’m showing the informative nature of the contour as it provides the framework for the finished gradation of garlic and cloves. contour of garlic Notice how the contour allows you to reveal your thought process of compositional considerations, the light source, area of emphasis. Once you have determined those elements, you are free to keep your eye on the subject and allow your personality to flow out onto the page. At this point, I keep my eye on the subject, let my hand become an extension of the eye, and rarely look at the surface of the paper. The contour line moves from light to dark describing the three dimensional nature of the subject, the light source, and the storyline you have set forth. Notice how my contour is curvilinear in nature. Yours will be very different. You can find examples such as these in my book The Little Book of Drawing; a Friendly Approach. My teaching style is encouraging in nature and allows you to try different media, techniques, and to find your own personal style of story telling through drawing. gradated garlic

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